National Geographic

@natgeo 5 months ago
Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | Lions’ eyes don’t close when the animals are sedated, so they’re fitted with hoods to protect their eyes from the light. The hoods also helps to keep them calm should the sedative start to wear off. This lion was part of an international transfer of 24 lions from South Africa, the largest lion relocation ever undertaken. After years of civil war in Mozambique, lions were all but lost in the Zambezi Delta region. Just a few decades ago, prides of lions once roamed the game-rich wetlands of the Zambezi Delta. But their numbers were decimated when their prey was overhunted during the drawn-out Mozambican civil wars, which raged from 1977 to 1992. Across Africa, a similar decline is occurring, with wild lion numbers dropping 42 percent in the last two decades, mostly as a result of habitat loss. This translocation has restored this apex predator to its ancestral lands and it is estimated that the population could grow to as many as 500 within 15 years. Already, 20 cubs have been born since the lions’ release.
I covered this historic undertaking for my recent @natgeo story. Learn more by following @amivitale and reading "How the world’s largest lion relocation was pulled off."
@natgeoimagecollection @thephotosociety #lions #worldlionday #mozambique #worthmorealive

Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | Lions’ eyes don’t close when the animals are sedated, so they’re fitted with hoods to protect their eyes from the light. The hoods also helps to keep them calm should the sedative start to wear off. This lion was part of an international transfer of 24 lions from South Africa, the largest lion relocation ever undertaken. After years of civil war in Mozambique, lions were all but lost in the Zambezi Delta region. Just a few decades ago, prides of lions once roamed the game-rich wetlands of the Zambezi Delta. But their numbers were decimated when their prey was overhunted during the drawn-out Mozambican civil wars, which raged from 1977 to 1992. Across Africa, a similar decline is occurring, with wild lion numbers dropping 42 percent in the last two decades, mostly as a result of habitat loss. This translocation has restored this apex predator to its ancestral lands and it is estimated that the population could grow to as many as 500 within 15 years. Already, 20 cubs have been born since the lions’ release. I covered this historic undertaking for my recent @natgeo story. Learn more by following @amivitale and reading "How the world’s largest lion relocation was pulled off." @natgeoimagecollection @thephotosociety #lions #worldlionday #mozambique #worthmorealive