National Geographic

@natgeo 2 months ago
Photo by @simonnorfolkstudio I An outtake from a story about new archaeology in Jerusalem for the December issue of the magazine. Judean pillar figurines were common in Judah during the Iron Age period (circa 800–586 B.C.E.). Thousands of these household objects have been found identified with either the goddesses Astarte or Asherah. It is thought they were kept as amulets to enhance fertility and offer protection during childbirth. Their heads, often made from molds, display hairstyles resembling Egyptian wigs, with rows of curls, and sharply defined facial features. They have solid pillar bodies with oversized breasts under which the arms curve. The standard history of Israel at this time is that monotheistic, patriarchal Judaism was being formulated, but it seems many people were still worshipping powerful fertility goddesses. For more on this project follow @simonnorfolkstudio. #jerusalem #archaeology #Judean #Asherah #goddess

Photo by @simonnorfolkstudio I An outtake from a story about new archaeology in Jerusalem for the December issue of the magazine. Judean pillar figurines were common in Judah during the Iron Age period (circa 800–586 B.C.E.). Thousands of these household objects have been found identified with either the goddesses Astarte or Asherah. It is thought they were kept as amulets to enhance fertility and offer protection during childbirth. Their heads, often made from molds, display hairstyles resembling Egyptian wigs, with rows of curls, and sharply defined facial features. They have solid pillar bodies with oversized breasts under which the arms curve. The standard history of Israel at this time is that monotheistic, patriarchal Judaism was being formulated, but it seems many people were still worshipping powerful fertility goddesses. For more on this project follow @simonnorfolkstudio . #jerusalem #archaeology #Judean #Asherah #goddess