#aurora

Photo by Babak Tafreshi @BabakTafreshi | I felt an incredible connection to the history and culture of this far north land when the dazzling, dancing rays of aurora borealis appeared in a Viking village on September 27. This is where some of the earliest Nordic settlers lived in Iceland a thousand years ago. They were unaware that a nearby snow-capped mountain was (and remains) an active volcano. In 1104 a massive eruption ended life in the farming village. The replica turf houses were constructed near the original site, based on the archeological findings.⁣ Follow me @babaktafreshi for more visual stories under stars. #aurora #northernlights #vikings #nordic #twanight
Photo by Babak Tafreshi @BabakTafreshi | I felt an incredible connection to the history and culture...
Photo by Michael Melford @michaelmelford | While driving like mad to get to my destination, an aurora lit up the sky! I had flown into Fairbanks, Alaska, on assignment to photograph the wild and scenic river Birch Creek, some two hours away. I was very lucky, as the northern lights went on all night long, allowing me to get a good shot.  #Alaska #aurora #nightsky  #wildandscenic
Photo by Michael Melford @michaelmelford | While driving like mad to get to my destination, an auror...
"Entranced by the eerie dance of the Southern lights, I can’t help but remember sitting next to my children watching the movie “Frozen,” listening to “Let it go. Let it go.” I'm looking forward to reuniting with my family and loved ones tomorrow."⁣
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That's what astronaut Nick Hague (@astrohague) tweeted on Oct. 2 as he was preparing to return to Earth. The image is of an aurora, a phenomenon that occurs when charged particles from the Sun interact with Earth's magnetic field. Astronauts aboard the @iss are frequently treated to views of aurorae as they orbit Earth at 17,500 mph (28,000 kph). Hague and his two crewmates, cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin of Roscosmos and visiting astronaut Hazzaa Ali Almansoori of the United Arab Emirates, are scheduled to touch down at 7am ET on Oct. 3. ⁣
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#nasa #aurora #space #iss #beauty #views
"Entranced by the eerie dance of the Southern lights, I can’t help but remember sitting next to my c...
Ever wondered what auroras look like from space? Astronaut Alexander Gerst (@Astro_Alex_ESA) gives us his space-based view from aboard the International Space Station (@ISS), tweeting that the experience is "[m]ind-blowing, every single time." The dancing lights of the auroras provide spectacular views on the ground and from space, but also capture the imagination of scientists who study incoming energy and particles from the Sun. Auroras are one effect of such energetic particles, which can speed out from the sun both in a steady stream called the solar wind and due to giant eruptions known as coronal mass ejections. After a trip toward Earth that can last 2 or 3 days, the solar particles and magnetic fields cause the release of particles already trapped near Earth, which in turn trigger reactions in the upper atmosphere in which oxygen and nitrogen molecules release photons of light. The result: the Northern and Southern lights.

Image Credit: @europeanspaceagency/NASA-A.Gerst
#NASA #space #aurora #science #northernlights #southernlights #spacestation #iss #earth #picoftheday #pictureoftheday
Ever wondered what auroras look like from space? Astronaut Alexander Gerst (@Astro_Alex_ESA) gives u...
The most recent flight of our SOFIA flying observatory brought the team so far south that they spotted the southern lights, also known as Aurora Australis. The Milky Way and Mars are also visible in this image taken at 43,000 feet. 
The SOFIA telescope (@SOFIAtelescope) uses an outfitted Boeing 747SP jetliner that’s been modified to carry a 106-inch diameter telescope, and uses infrared light to study celestial objects best viewed from the Southern Hemisphere. The latest flight was aimed at studying the center of the Milky Way and the Tarantula Nebula. 
Creating images of the celestial magnetic fields found in the center of our Milky Way galaxy will help scientists better understand the shape and strength of these fields and gain new insights into how they impact the processes in the our galactic center. 
Mapping the Tarantula Nebula, which has a cluster of thousands of stars forming at once, will help researchers determine the speed and direction of the molecules in the nebula to determine if the material is expanding, forming new stars or if the star formation process has been stunted.

Credit: NASA

#NASA #space #nebula #SOFIA #747 #BlackHoles #galaxies #stars #supernova #MilkyWay #TarantulaNebula #AuroraAustralis #SouthernHemisphere #South #SouthernLights #aurora #science #mars #universe #Boeing747
The most recent flight of our SOFIA flying observatory brought the team so far south that they spott...
The striking south polar region of our solar system’s largest inhabitant, Jupiter, was viewed by our Juno (@NASAJuno) spacecraft as it neared completion of its 10th close flyby on Dec. 16, 2017. The “empty” space above and below Jupiter in this color-enhanced image can trick the mind, causing the viewer to perceive the gas giant planet is less colossal than it is. In reality, Jupiter is wide enough to fit 11 Earths across! 
Citizen scientist Gerald Eichstädt processed this image using data from the JunoCam imager. All of JunoCam's raw images are available for the public to peruse and process into image products! Just visit www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam. 
In Greek and Roman mythology, Jupiter drew a veil of clouds around himself to hide his mischief. It was Jupiter's wife, the goddess Juno, who was able to peer through the clouds and reveal Jupiter's true nature. Our Juno spacecraft arrived at planet Jupiter on July 4, 2016, not seeking signs of misbehavior, but to help us to understand the planet's structure and history. 
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt 
#nasa #space #juno #junocam #spacecraft#jupiter #planet #solarsystem #aurora#clouds #storm #swirls #turbulent#atmosphere #pictureoftheday #beautiful#textured #explore #discover #science#northern #hemisphere
The striking south polar region of our solar system’s largest inhabitant, Jupiter, was viewed by our...
The rich, colorful tapestry of Jupiter's southern hemisphere abound with vibrant cloud bands and storms was beheld by our Juno (@NasaJuno) spacecraft from 8,453 miles above during its tenth close flyby of the giant planet on Dec. 16, 2017. The dark region in the far left is called the South Temperate Belt. Intersecting the belt is a ghost-like feature of slithering white clouds, the largest feature in Jupiter's low latitudes.

Citizen scientist Kevin M. Gill processed this image using data from the JunoCam imager. All of JunoCam's raw images are available for the public to peruse and process into image products! Just visit go.nasa.gov/JunoCam.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill

#nasa #space #juno #junocam #spacecraft #jupiter #planet #solarsystem #aurora #clouds #storm #swirls #turbulent #atmosphere #pictureoftheday #beautiful #textured #explore #discover #science #southern #hemisphere
The rich, colorful tapestry of Jupiter's southern hemisphere abound with vibrant cloud bands and sto...
Mind-bending, color-enhanced swirls of Jupiter’s turbulent atmosphere can be seen in this Juno spacecraft (@NASAJuno) image of the planet. Juno captured this picture of colorful, textured clouds in Jupiter’s northern hemisphere on Dec. 16, 2017 at a distance of about 8,292 miles above the cloud tops. 
Citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran processed this image using data from the JunoCam imager. All of JunoCam's raw images are available for the public to peruse and process into image products! Just visit www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam. 
Our Juno spacecraft arrived at Jupiter on July 4, 2016 with a goal to understand the origin and evolution of the planet, look for a solid planetary core, map Jupiter’s magnetic field, measure water and ammonia in the atmosphere and observe the planet’s auroras. 
Enhanced Image by Gerald Eichstadt and Sean Doran (CC BY-NC-SA) based on images provided Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS

#nasa #space #juno #junocam #spacecraft #jupiter #planet #solarsystem #aurora #clouds #storm #swirls #turbulent #atmosphere #pictureoftheday #beautiful #textured #explore #discover #science #northern #hemisphere
Mind-bending, color-enhanced swirls of Jupiter’s turbulent atmosphere can be seen in this Juno space...
This time-lapse video from astronauts on the International Space Station (@ISS) shows an aurora above Canada beginning over the California coast, to North Dakota then on to Quebec when day breaks. Taken on Sept. 15, 2017, the orbiting laboratory is located 250 miles above Earth and is traveling at 17,500 miles per hour. 
At any given time, the station is home to more than 250 experiments, including some that are helping us determine the effects of microgravity on the human body. Research on the station will not only help us send humans deeper into space than ever before, including to Mars, but also benefits life here on Earth.

Credit: NASA
#nasa #space #spacestation #aurora #stars #night #glowing #astronaut #solararray #picoftheday #earth #globe #home
This time-lapse video from astronauts on the International Space Station (@ISS) shows an aurora abov...
The aurora borealis, Latin for northern lights, over Canada is sighted from the International Space Station (@iss) near the highest point of its orbital path. The station’s main solar arrays are seen in the left foreground. 
There are currently six people living and working on the space station, which is located 250 miles above the Earth. As it orbits our home planet, they conduct important research in the unique microgravity laboratory. This science will not only help us travel farther into the solar system, but also has direct benefits to life on Earth. 
Credit: NASA 
#nasa #space #aurora #auroraborealis #latin #northernlights #lights #canada #spacestation #photography #earth #planet #home #astronomy #science #picoftheday #nofilter
The aurora borealis, Latin for northern lights, over Canada is sighted from the International Space...
Jupiter’s intense northern and southern auroras present a pulsating polar puzzle to scientists, according to a new study using data from our Chandra X-ray and ESA's XMM-Newton observatories. Using these observations, a team of researchers produced maps of Jupiter's X-ray emissions and identified an X-ray hot spot at each pole that had very different characteristics. Swipe to see both poles of Jupiter.

The X-ray emission at Jupiter's south pole consistently pulsed every 11 minutes, but the X-rays seen from the north pole were erratic, increasing and decreasing in brightness — seemingly independent of the emission from the south pole. Each hot spot can cover an area equal to about half the surface of the Earth.

This makes Jupiter particularly puzzling. X-ray auroras have never been detected from our Solar System's other gas giants, including Saturn. Jupiter is also unlike Earth, where the auroras on our planet's north and south poles generally mirror each other because the magnetic fields are similar.

Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/UCL/W.Dunn et al, Optical: Enhanced Image by Gerald Eichstadt and Sean Doran (CC BY-NC-SA) based on images provided Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS 
#nasa #space #jupiter #chandra #xmmnewton #xray #aurora #juno #spacecraft #storm #planet #polar #cloudscape #picoftheday #solarsystem #astronomy #science
Jupiter’s intense northern and southern auroras present a pulsating polar puzzle to scientists, acco...
Awesome sauce or aurora? Both! NASA astronaut Jack Fischer posted this stunning image to his social accounts on July 11 saying, “One of my favorite things to do in my free time is watch the Aurora – it’s almost alive, as it slathers up the sky in awesome sauce.” The International Space Station is currently orbiting the Earth from 250 miles above at 17,500 miles per hour. Three humans are currently living and working on the space station, conducting research and science that benefits humanity and also helps advance the exploration of our solar system. 
Credit: NASA 
#nasa #space #astronaut #spacestation #aurora #awesome #awesomesauce #astro2fish #international #science #orbit #laboratory #research #earth #spacepic
Awesome sauce or aurora? Both! NASA astronaut Jack Fischer posted this stunning image to his social...