#campaignfornature

Photo by Charlie Hamilton James @chamiltonjames | // Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for Nature committed to protecting 30% of the planet by 2030. // An adult male lion sleeps on the plains of the Mara Naboisho Conservancy in Kenya. His brother is also asleep nearby. Lions sleep a lot. Females, which tend to do the bulk of the hunting and all of the cub rearing, can sleep 15+ hours per day; males can sleep up to 20+ hours. If they've eaten a big meal, they often get up only to drink and visit the bush toilet. These two boys hadn't eaten, and it had rained heavily all night, so I guess they needed a little extra shut eye. #campaignfornature
Photo by Charlie Hamilton James @chamiltonjames | // Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for...
Photo by Charlie Hamilton James @chamiltonjames | //Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for Nature committed to protecting 30% of the planet by 2030.// At dawn today on the plains of the Mara Naboisho Conservancy, a large male Maasai giraffe feeds on a balanite tree. Maasai giraffes, once common across East Africa, are now listed as endangered. This image was taken using a strobe light held from a nearby car that the giraffe was oblivious to. Shot with help from Stratton Hatfield #campaignfornature
Photo by Charlie Hamilton James @chamiltonjames | //Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for N...
Photos by @brentstirton | // Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for Nature committed to protecting 30% of the planet by 2030. // For the December issue, I spent time with African Parks conservation rangers in Zakouma, in Chad, and Garamba, in the Democratic Republic of Congo. I was briefly a witness to their phenomenal dedication as well as to the cost of that dedication. From months away from their families in spartan conditions, to conflict with heavily armed poachers and militias, to working closely with tracker dogs and technology, these people make an incredible contribution to ensuring the survival of a global conservation heritage. The goal of African Parks is to have 20 parks under management by 2020. Without these men and women, that would be impossible. I’m very grateful to all the AP rangers who helped us to tell their story. @natgeo @africanparksnetwork #conservation #endangeredspecies #campaignfornature
Photos by @brentstirton | // Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for Nature committed to prot...
Photos by @brentstirton | // Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for Nature committed to protecting 30% of the planet by 2030. // African Parks is a nonprofit conservation organization that takes on the rehabilitation and management of national parks, in partnership with governments and local communities. I photographed in five parks, and in the course of that whirlwind tour, I caught a glimpse of the extraordinary effort to conserve endangered species in some of the toughest places. This included black rhino care and translocation, rare Kordofan giraffes, West African lions and crocodiles, and the world’s largest elephant herd. African Parks currently manages 16 national parks and protected areas in 10 countries, covering almost 11 million hectares. That represents the largest and most diverse portfolio of parks under management on the African continent. They do this job with a skeleton crew, often living in spartan conditions for years at a time. It’s an incredible effort to ensure the survival of a global conservation heritage. Their goal to is have 20 parks under management by 2020. I’m very grateful to all the AP people who helped us tell their story.  @africanparksnetwork #conservation #endangeredspecies #campaignfornature
Photos by @brentstirton | // Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for Nature committed to prot...
Photo by Charlie Hamilton James @chamiltonjames | // Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for Nature committed to protecting 30% of the planet by 2030. // Spotted hyena pups emerge from their den at sunset on the plains of Kenya's Maasai Mara as their clan rests. The pups are just a few weeks old, but already venturing out of the den to mix with the older hyenas, establish bonds, and confirm hierarchy. Hyenas live in matriarchal clans, and even young pups can be dominant over adult members of the clan, especially male members, which tend to rank low in the pecking order. #campaignfornature
Photo by Charlie Hamilton James @chamiltonjames | // Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for...
Photo by Charlie Hamilton James @chamiltonjames | // Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for Nature committed to protecting 30% of the planet by 2030. // A young Thomson's gazelle leaps across the plains of Kenya's Maasai Mara at sunset. The gazelle was grazing among a herd of zebra and topi when it decided to stretch its legs by running at high speed for a few minutes. Thomson's gazelles are one of the world's fastest land animals, able to hit speeds of 55 miles per hour. They need to be fast: they're a favorite prey of cheetahs. So running and leaping like this might perhaps be a valuable activity, designed to keep them fit and practicing weaving and dodging—which could save a tommie's life one day. #campaignfornature
Photo by Charlie Hamilton James @chamiltonjames | // Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for...
Photo by Charlie Hamilton James @chamiltonjames I // Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for Nature committed to protecting 30% of the planet by 2030. // At dawn this morning in the Maasai Mara National Reserve, two male lions guard their kill. The brothers, known locally as Flappy Left Ear and Junk Left Ear, killed the large eland the day before yesterday and have been feeding on it since. They take turns leaving its side to drink or sleep, but one always guards it from the hungry vultures and hyenas that remain ever present. #campaignfornature
Photo by Charlie Hamilton James @chamiltonjames I // Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for...
Photo by Charlie Hamilton James @chamiltonjames | //Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for Nature committed to protecting 30% of the planet by 2030. // An ocelot triggers a camera trap as it walks across a tree that bridges a river in the rainforests of Costa Rica's Osa Peninsula. Ocelots hunt small mammals and birds in the forest, both on the ground and in the trees. Shot with the help of Andy Whitworth, David Garcia, and @osaconservation. #campaignfornature
Photo by Charlie Hamilton James @chamiltonjames | //Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for N...
Photo by Beverly Joubert @beverlyjoubert | A stark but unmistakably feline silhouette is set against a colorful sky of rain. I always think it is lucky to see a leopard; with their phenomenal talent for disappearing in plain sight, it's entirely up to them whether or not they'll show themselves. Finding a leopard at the end of a rainbow must be especially lucky. Their luck in living with us, however, is running out. Leopards have lost 75% of their historical range, and while they are incredibly adaptable, there's only so far that they can conform when their prey is less adaptable and the pressures from our activities are only increasing. In order to protect big cats like this, we need to conserve at least 30% of the planet by 2030. #CampaignforNature #ThisIsMytrophy #Leopard #BigCats
Photo by Beverly Joubert @beverlyjoubert | A stark but unmistakably feline silhouette is set against...
Photo by Charlie Hamilton James @chamiltonjames I Spinner dolphins hunt for sardines and lantern fish in the clear Pacific waters off Costa Rica. Spinners form huge pods of up over 1,000 individuals. They are known as spinner dolphins because they spin (up to 5.5 times) as they leap from the water. Shot two days ago on assignment for @natgeo for a story on Costa Rica's Osa Peninsular, with @osaconservation @uwrealm and @pstalks. In order to protect places like this, we need to conserve 30% of the planet by 2030. #CampaignforNature
Photo by Charlie Hamilton James @chamiltonjames I Spinner dolphins hunt for sardines and lantern fis...
Photo by Cristina Mittermeier @cristinamittermeier | Deep in the lush Great Bear Rainforest, a black bear takes advantage of a perfect fishing spot: a series of small falls where pink salmon push against the current, heading upstream. Life here thrives because of the balance of delicate relationships between species. The bears, salmon, and trees are all an integral part of this intricate ecosystem. #FollowMe at @CristinaMittermeier and explore my feed for more photos of Canadian #wildlife. #BritishColumbia #CampaignforNature #NatureNeedsHalf
Photo by Cristina Mittermeier @cristinamittermeier | Deep in the lush Great Bear Rainforest, a black...
Photo by Beverly Joubert @beverlyjoubert | A trio of red lechwe males are silhouetted against a fiery Okavango sky. The lechwe population at Duba Plains has risen phenomenally in the decade since we've taken management of the concession and stopped hunting in the area. There were around a thousand lechwe 10 years ago, and today we're in the region of 10,000. These higher antelope numbers have meant that more predators can be supported on this island. While territory is always important, a lion pride can do very well here without the need to cover enormous areas or rely largely on the buffalo herds that move through seasonally. In order to protect places and wildlife like this, we need to conserve 30% of the planet by 2030. #CampaignforNature #redlechwe #okavango #DubaPlains #linkedecosystem
Photo by Beverly Joubert @beverlyjoubert | A trio of red lechwe males are silhouetted against a fier...