#stoppoaching

Photo by @amivitale | Zebras run through the Zambezi Delta. Wildlife in this area was virtually decimated by years of civil war,  but investments in anti-poaching by @zambezedeltaconservation made the land welcoming again to animals. Zebra populations went from almost zero to many hundreds. Today, nearly all wildlife have come back virtually to capacity, with the exception of the apex predators. So the team orchestrated the largest international lion translocation ever undertaken. Twenty-four lions were transported from South Africa to the conservancy. It is estimated that that the population could grow to as many as 500 within 15 years; over 30 cubs have been born in the past 10 months.

I covered this historic undertaking for my recent @natgeo story. Learn more by reading "How the world’s largest lion relocation was pulled off." @natgeoimagecollection @thephotosociety @cabelafamilyfoundation  #protectearth #conservation #zebras #stoppoaching #mozambique
Photo by @amivitale | Zebras run through the Zambezi Delta. Wildlife in this area was virtually deci...
Photo by @amivitale | Veterinarians wait for a lion to wake up from its sedation after being flown to Mozambique from South Africa and then driven to an enclosure. Twenty-four lions were moved in what was the largest conservation transport of wild lions across an international boundary in history. Decades of civil war and poaching had all but decimated the animals in this area, and careful management had brought back nearly all the other indigenous species—with the exception of these apex predators. So far all are thriving, and already over 30 cubs have been born since December. I covered this historic undertaking for my recent @natgeo story. Learn more by reading "How the world’s largest lion relocation was pulled off.” @zambezedeltaconservation @natgeoimagecollection @thephotosociety @photog.for.good @cabelafamilyfoundation #conservation #lions #savelions #stoppoaching #mozambique
Photo by @amivitale | Veterinarians wait for a lion to wake up from its sedation after being flown t...
Photo by @amivitale | Elephant keeper Naomi Leshongoro feeds a hungry orphaned elephant. Naomi is one of the very first female indigenous Samburu keepers at @r.e.s.c.u.e. As the first indigenous Samburu women keepers in all of Africa, they are blazing a trail for girls in their community and for women everywhere. Through their determination and grit, they have helped change the perception of women, and shown that women too can care for elephants and work outside the home. Says Dorothy Lowuekuduk, head keeper at Reteti: “The women of Reteti, have shown my community, my country, and the entire world that this job is not just for men.” This oasis where orphans grow up, learning to be wild so that one day they can rejoin their herds, is a story as much about the elephants as it is about all of humanity. Follow @amivitale and @r.e.s.c.u.e to learn more and get involved.
@conservationorg @thephotosociety @natgeoimagecollection #elephants #stoppoaching #kenya #worthmorealive
Photo by @amivitale | Elephant keeper Naomi Leshongoro feeds a hungry orphaned elephant. Naomi is on...
Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | Mary Lengees, one of the first female elephant keepers at Reteti Elephant Sanctuary in northern Kenya, caresses Suyian, the first resident. The dedicated keepers here provide round-the-clock care to the most vulnerable elephants to ensure the best outcomes, staying with them throughout the night. Mary is a trailblazer and an inspiration to me and to all who know her. She is one of the very first indigenous Samburu keepers in all of Africa. Although the idea of women working outside of the home is new here, the community has embraced the program. When the seven women keepers return to their homes, the people in their villages rush to them to hear news about the elephants in their care. 
Follow @amivitale and @r.e.s.c.u.e to get involved and support this crucial work.
@conservationorg @thephotosociety @natgeoimagecollection #protectelephants #elephants #stoppoaching #kenya #worthmorealive

Nat Geo is celebrating women who fearlessly push boundaries and inspire the next generation of changemakers. For a week, all of our posts and stories on @natgeo were photographed by women, about women. Use #NatGeoWomenofImpact to share how a woman in your life has empowered you.
Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | Mary Lengees, one of the first female elephant keepers at Reteti El...
Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | Elephant keeper Lekupania gets a kiss from little Kapai on their daily nature walk at Reteti Elephant Sanctuary (@r.e.s.c.u.e). Having arrived so young, Kapai had a lot to learn about being an elephant, but she had the rest of the Reteti herd and her keepers to show her how to browse, graze, and navigate. Someday soon, she'll be big and strong, ready to return to the wild. Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the first ever community-owned and -run elephant sanctuary in Africa. It provides a safe place for injured and orphaned elephant calves to heal so that they can be returned back to the wild. Reteti operates in partnership with Conservation International, which provides critical operational support and works to scale the community-centered model to create lasting impacts worldwide. Learn how you can get involved and support this crucial work by following @r.e.s.c.u.e and @amivitale 
@thephotosociety @natgeoimagecollection #protectelephants #elephants #stoppoaching #kenya #worthmorealive
Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | Elephant keeper Lekupania gets a kiss from little Kapai on their da...
Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | A wild elephant herd passes through an area called Loijuk, near Reteti Elephant Sanctuary (@r.e.s.c.u.e) in northern Kenya. Before @r.e.s.c.ue was founded, orphaned elephants had to be transported 240 miles away, and they would be reintroduced in Tsavo National Park, in Kenya's south. There was no chance they would ever encounter their kin again. One of the great benefits @r.e.s.c.u.e offers is that now these elephant calves are raised near where they were rescued and may be able to return to the same herds they were originally separated from. Learn how to get involved by following @amivitale and @r.e.s.c.u.e. @conservationorg @thephotosociety @natgeoimagecollection #protectelephants #elephants #stoppoaching #kenya #worthmorealive
Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | A wild elephant herd passes through an area called Loijuk, near Ret...
Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | Baby orphaned elephants, Lemorijo and Kapai walk together as they learn to browse in the wild, stripping leaves, tasting bark, pushing down small trees, and, best of all, taking luxurious mud baths at Reteti Elphant Sanctuary (@r.e.s.c.u.e) in Kenya. These little elephants are learning to become nature’s greatest engineers. By eating the trees and brush, they keep the land open and grassy. Without them, other wildlife, people, and livestock all suffer. @r.e.s.c.u.e is the first ever community-owned and run elephant sanctuary in Africa, providing a safe place for injured elephants to heal and later be returned to the wild. Follow @amivitale to learn how I am using my personal photography to support their crucial work. @conservationorg @thephotosociety @natgeoimagecollection #protectelephants #elephants #stoppoaching #kenya #worthmorealive
Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | Baby orphaned elephants, Lemorijo and Kapai walk together as they l...
Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | Keepers at Reteti Elephant Sanctuary (@r.e.s.c.u.e) gather in the "boma" with a handful of the rambunctious orphans in their care. These women are some of the first indigenous Samburu women elephant keepers in  Africa. Traditionally in Kenya women marry young and are meant to care for their children and homes. Although women had never been keepers before, the community has embraced the new program and is excited to hear what these women have accomplished, rushing to them when they return home to learn news of each of the elephants in their care.

What’s happening at Reteti is nothing less than the beginnings of a transformation, not only in the way humans relate to wild animals but also how we relate to one another. This oasis where orphans grow up, learning to be wild so that one day they can rejoin their herds, is a story as much about the elephants as it is about all of humanity. Follow @amivitale and @r.e.s.c.u.e get involved and support their crucial work. 
@conservationorg @thephotosociety @natgeoimagecollection #protectelephants #elephants #stoppoaching #kenya #worthmorealive
Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | Keepers at Reteti Elephant Sanctuary (@r.e.s.c.u.e) gather in the "...
Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | Naomi, one of the dedicated keepers at Reteti Elephant Sanctuary (@r.e.s.c.u.e) and one of the very first indigenous Samburu women keepers in Africa, gets a caress from Shaba, @r.e.s.c.u.e's proxy matriarch. Shaba was rescued in November 2016, when poachers shot her mother dead. She arrived traumatized. It took the team a long time to gain her trust, spending day and night talking, singing, offering seed pods and fresh grass, anything they could think of. Then, one day she finally took a bottle and a strong bond was formed. Today, she is instrumental to the sanctuary. She keeps order, teaches the young ones how to forage and navigate steep paths, and, most incredibly, greets every new orphan at the sanctuary with a heartfelt and emotional hello. Follow @amivitale and @r.e.s.c.u.e to learn how you can support this crucial work.
@conservationorg @thephotosociety @natgeoimagecollection #protectelephants #elephants #stoppoaching #kenya #worthmorealive
Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | Naomi, one of the dedicated keepers at Reteti Elephant Sanctuary (@...
Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | Elephants enjoy a mud bath at Reteti Elephant Sanctuary (@r.e.s.c.u.e). A coating of soil helps protect sensitive elephant skin by acting as both sunscreen and insect repellent. These elephants are being cared for by members of the local community: “We take care of the elephants, and the elephants are taking care of us. We now have a relationship between us.” Follow @amivitale to learn how I am using my personal photography to support @r.e.s.c.u.e's crucial work.
@conservationorg @thephotosociety @natgeoimagecollection #protectelephants #elephants #stoppoaching #kenya #worthmorealive
Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | Elephants enjoy a mud bath at Reteti Elephant Sanctuary (@r.e.s.c.u...
Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | During my first trip to @lewa_wildlife, I met the incredible Leperere, pictured here with Tipper the tracking dog. Leperere is a ranger who has dedicated his life and career to guarding orphaned or abandoned endangered wildlife. Like many rangers across the world, Leperere is selfless and gives his all to protecting the vulnerable rhinos under his care. While we're confronted with stories of despair and rampant poaching across Africa, it is important to shine a light on the successes and amplify the voices like Leperere and all of his colleagues. It's not easy, but the rangers of @lewa_wildlife have proven that it's possible to achieve conservation successes: they have had zero poaching of wildlife during the last six years, and their endangered rhino population now stands at more than 200! By working with their neighboring communities and the government and by investing in technology, the team at @Lewa_wildlife is saving threatened wildlife, including the more than 200 rhinos that makes up 15% of Kenya's entire rhino population. This World Ranger Day, Learn how to get involved and support @lewa_wildlife @natgeoimagecollection @thephotosociety #WorldRangerDay #wildlife #kenya #stoppoaching #dogs
Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | During my first trip to @lewa_wildlife, I met the incredible Lepere...
Photos by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | At Liwonde National Park, in Malawi, I had the enormous privilege and pleasure to work with the British Army, documenting their lives while working in this beautiful part of the planet. These are also challenging environments to work in. It was very clear that those who chose to carry out this work knew the risks, and they did so simply because they could, should, and wanted to help protect the planet's wildlife and ecosystems. Operation Corded, the name given to the army's counter-poaching deployment in Malawi, assists in training rangers in a bid to help them crack down on the illegal wildlife trade. Park rangers are taught skills such as tracking, partnered patrolling, communications, surveillance, and intelligence sharing. 
An armed patrol of British soldiers and African park rangers was walking through tall grass up to 7 feet (2.1 m) high when they disturbed an unseen herd of elephants. It's worth noting that it's for this very reason that poachers chose to raze the park to the ground: in order to see wildlife more easily and thus slaughter it  more easily. Mathew Talbot, 22, of the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, was charged and killed by an elephant. This is a reminder of the danger faced by those who choose to protect some of the world's most endangered species from those who seek to profit from the criminal slaughter of wildlife. As the sun sets in Malawi, RIP Guardsman Talbot and all those who pay the ultimate price for conservation. Follow me @chancellordavid to see more #malawi #conservation #stoppoaching #elephants #rhino @everydayextinction @thephotosociety
Photos by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | At Liwonde National Park, in Malawi, I had the enormou...